Saturday, August 8, 2015

DIY Assessment Chart for Multiple Classes- Great for Traveling Teachers!

BEING AN ELEMENTARY SPANISH TEACHER, I have lots of students...as in, about 400! I know of many teachers who have more (how do they do it?!), and we all face a similar challenge- how to keep track of student data when you have so many of them? Charts, binders, post its, notes tucked into a pocket...I've used them all! This year, I wanted to be more organized, particularly with my assessment data- my summative grades I enter into my computer using JumpRope, an online standardized grading program, but it's not always great for on the fly grading. I perused Pinterest, and found a chart used for reading levels which I decided to modify to suit my purpose.


I WANTED A CHART I COULD USE WITH MULTIPLE CLASSES, that was reusable, and easy to manage. Since each of my grade levels has 3-4 classes, I didn't want tons of charts running around...keeping all the data for a grade level together makes it easier when I go to input grades. Using file folders, velcro and some scrapbooking paper, I came up with the above chart- easy to change out kiddos' names for each assessment, easy to transport or keep in a file, and dare I say, cute?

HERE'S HOW I MADE IT! First, of course, I got some nice folders (no manila for me!).  I also grabbed a sheet of cute scrapbooking paper that was already divided into strips of color (any heavyweight paper will do!). I wrote all my kiddos for this grade level on the scrapbooking paper, WITHOUT cutting the paper apart- wait for it! I then put a strip of velcro along the back (without cutting that either)... what a time saver! Now I could cut the names apart without having to then cut the velcro and stick it to the back of every name! Ahhhh...genius!


NEXT, I organized the inside of the folder using number stickers along the top (I use a 4 point system), small velcro strips on the sides for the teacher names, and strips of velcro for each class under each grade. I put two strips under '3' because most kiddos fall in that range statistically so I knew I would need more velcro there. Lastly, it was time to put the names in...¡ta-chán! My first grade assessment chart is ready to go- love it! What do you think? What do you use for data tracking?

https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipMk0RMH8MFmOB_yJMuvVMH7xBx_qfLl8oqOQXbA

6 comments:

  1. This is a very cool idea! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks so much for your comment! I used it last year very successfully- although it was a lot of work to set up, I now have the names done for this year for all grades but Kindergarten, so much less work! ~Julie

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  3. Hola! I was wondering if you could explain a little more about your 4 point system? And if possible, any other suggestions you may have on a similar topic- on using ACTFL proficiency levels in elementary?

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    1. Actually, I think I found the answer to my first question- it must be the taco rubrics! Yes?

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    2. Hi Rachel! Yes, the taco rubric is exactly it! On our report cards we use the numbers 4 through 1, but each number corresponds to a part of the taco rubric. I have more specific rubrics for the assessments we do, but the taco rubric is the overarching language. :) Julie

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